'PRINT' Act introduced to protect publishers, printers from tariffs 5/14/18

Monday, in an effort to protect printers and publishers from unwarranted tariffs, Senators Susan Collins (R-ME) and Angus King (I-ME) introduced S. 2385, the "Protecting Rational Incentives in Newsprint Trade Act of 2018," or "PRINT Act." Senators Roy Blunt (R-MO), Shelley Moore Capito (R-WV), Deb Fischer (R-NE), Johnny Isakson (R-GA), Doug Jones (D-AL), Claire McCaskill (D-MO), Jerry Moran (R-KS) and Roger Wicker (R-MS) joined as original co-sponsors.

The PRINT Act would suspend new tariffs currently being imposed on imported uncoated groundwood paper from Canada, which is the primary source of newsprint and other paper used by domestic newspapers, book publishers and commercial printers. Simultaneously, the legislation would require the Department of Commerce to review the economic health of the printing and publishing industries. Newspapers and printers across the United States have told Congress that the new import tariffs – as high as 32 percent – would jeopardize the viability of the industry and threaten to decimate the U.S. paper industry's customer base.

SNPA President Patrick Dorsey, publisher of the Herald-Tribune Media Group in Sarasota, Fla., and regional vice president Coastal Group, GateHouse Media, said: "We appreciate the leadership of Senator Collins and Senator King and the other co-sponsors of the bill for stepping up to protect American jobs and stop these damaging tariffs. They fully understand this action was caused by one outlier mill owned by a hedge fund and is not supported by the broader domestic newspaper producing industry. These unfair job-killing import taxes are already taking a toll across the country as newspapers have had to eliminate jobs and take other significant cost saving measures to maintain viable businesses. This is putting many community newspapers in jeopardy and further reducing their ability to keep our citizens informed on what is going on in their cities and towns. Ultimately, this is damaging to our representative democracy. The PRINT Act is a positive step in reversing these damaging impacts."

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Local newspapers fear tariffs could cripple them 4/24/18

The Tampa Bay Times, Florida's largest newspaper, said this week that it is cutting about 50 jobs. Publisher Paul Tash told CNN Money that tariffs have added an additional $3 million in expenses that the paper can't absorb.

In this article, see how tariffs also are affecting newspapers published by Community Newspaper Holdings Inc. and Boone Newspapers.

Read more from CNN Money

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Galveston paper uses in-house ads to ask readers to get involved 4/16/18

The Galveston County Daily News is running a series of ads calling on its readers to contact the governor, their U.S. Senators and U.S. Representative to help fight the newsprint tariff that is being imposed on newspapers across the country.

And, in an editorial published at the end of March, the paper's editorial board outlined how these tariffs will hurt readers. "Newspapers are vital to the communities they serve. Everyone relies on a newspaper to tell the local stories, both good and bad. We report on city and county governments, schools, crime, sports, weddings, anniversaries, births and obituaries.

"Nobody else reports on our community with the depth and breadth of this newspaper – but it's not an easy business, and these tariffs will make it even harder."

In a recent news article The Daily News noted that newspapers across the country are finding supplies short and prices spiking.

To meet these challenges, the paper told readers that they may start noticing a few changes "to navigate this period of great disruption."

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Now available: Ads to fight newsprint tariffs 4/3/18

The News Media Alliance and the Stop Tariffs on Printers & Publishers (STOPP) Coalition have provided several new ads for newspapers to run in their publications. The ads educate readers on the negative consequences of the recent tariffs imposed on Canadian imports of uncoated groundwood paper, which includes newsprint used by newspapers.

Please run these ads in your publications and encourage your readers to stand up to protect their access to news, as well as jobs in their own community. The ads are editable, enabling you to insert your own newspaper's logo into them.

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Help us stop tariffs on newsprint 3/26/18

The Coalition to Stop Tariffs on Printers and Publishers is asking newspapers to take a stand and join the fight against unwarranted preliminary countervailing and antidumping duties imposed this year by the Department of Commerce on Canadian imports of uncoated groundwood paper, which includes newsprint used by newspapers, printers and other publishers. Combined, these duties climb as high as 32 percent.

Here are two ways to help now:

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SNPA joins coalition to stop baseless newsprint tariffs 3/19/18

SNPA is a member of a coalition announced Monday that is fighting proposed countervailing duties (CVD) and anti-dumping duties (AD) on imports of Canadian uncoated groundwood papers including newsprint and other papers.

The coalition – Stop Tariffs on Printers & Publishers (STOPP) – is comprised of members of the printing, publishing and paper-producing industries, which employ more than 600,000 workers.

These preliminary duties, which were assessed by the Department of Commerce in January and March, respectively, are the result of a petition filed by one company, North Pacific Paper Company (NORPAC), an outlier in the paper industry that is looking to use the U.S. government for its own financial gain. The STOPP coalition is concerned that these CVD and AD duties, which range up to 32 percent combined, will saddle U.S. printing and publishing businesses with increased costs and threaten thousands of American jobs.

"To think that one company could file a petition that would so adversely affect the entire newspaper industry is unconscionable," said SNPA Chairman Chris Reen, who is president and publisher of The Oklahoman Media Company. "The consequences of this will be devastating to an industry already under enormous financial pressure. The U.S. Department of Commerce and the U.S. International Trade Commission should heed the warnings from local publishers. There is no way to absorb these costs along the supply chain – they will lead to even more job losses and in some cases, outright news deserts."

SNPA President Patrick Dorsey said: "We are already working hard to absorb the price increases related to a tight newsprint supply environment. Implementing these unreasonable duties of up to 32 percent is inexcusable and will lead to a loss of many more jobs than they claim to save."

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Decatur Daily print edition frequency to change 2/5/18

In a column published yesterday, Clint Shelton, publisher of The Decatur (Ala.) Daily, announced that the paper is changing the print frequency of the paper to five days a week – because of changing reader habits and a new tariff being levied against newsprint.

Beginning March 5, the print edition of The Decatur (Ala.) Daily will be delivered daily except Saturday and Monday. The monthly subscription rate, unchanged since 2015, will not change.

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New paper tariffs could cost jobs at U.S. publishers 2/3/18

By Jon Allsop
Reprinted from Columbia Journalism Review

In mid-January, the U.S. Department of Commerce slapped a tariff on Canadian newsprint, which is used by around 75 percent of U.S. publishers and is particularly prevalent in the Northeast. Even though the duty may yet be reversed, American newspapers – already struggling to go to print in an era of rapidly declining circulation – have to pay it in the meantime. Many publishers fear it'll add upward of 10 percent to their print costs, and could even result in job losses.

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U.S. Senator for New York says duties on special paper from Canada will hurt newspapers 1/30/18

U.S. Senate Minority Leader Charles E. Schumer of New York urged the U.S. Department of Commerce on Friday, Jan. 26, to reconsider its recent decision to impose duties on the raw material – uncoated groundwood paper from Canada – used by already at-risk newspaper companies.

Schumer said Canadian groundwood paper is used by small to large newspapers, and if the federal government pursues large duties, newspapers, which already operate on tight margins, would suffer, causing workers to lose jobs and diminishing the flow of top-notch journalism.

Read more from U.S. Senator Charles Schumer

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